34 tons of garbage out from Mount Everest, Nepal Army and Sherpa launched cleanliness drive

garbage out from Mount Everest
garbage out from Mount Everest
Pintu Kumar

A team of 30 Army jawans and 48 Sherpas were engaged in the cleanliness drive. The team also included four doctors. The team handed over the flag to Nepal's Army Chief Prabhu Ram Sharma at the end of the campaign on Sunday.

Around 34 tonnes of garbage has been collected in Nepal from four mountains, including the world's highest peak, Mount Everest, as part of a clean-up drive that concluded on World Environment Day. A team led by Nepal Army collected 33.8 tonnes of garbage during 'Safa Himal Abhiyan 2022'. The campaign was launched on 5 April. This campaign, which started in the year 2019, was halted in 2020 due to the outbreak of Corona virus. This year the accumulated garbage is the highest. In a statement here, the army said that around 10 tonnes of garbage was collected in 2019 and over 27 tonnes last year.

The 'Safa Himal Abhiyan 2022' has been concluded on the occasion of World Environment Day on Sunday. A joint team of Nepal Army and Sherpas collected 33,877 kg of garbage from Mount Everest, Lhotse, Kangchenjunga and Manaslu.

This team engaged in the cleaning

campaign A team of 30 army personnel and 48 Sherpas were engaged in the cleanliness drive. The team also included four doctors. The team handed over the flag to Nepal's Army Chief Prabhu Ram Sharma at the end of the campaign on Sunday. Army Chief Sharma said that due to increasing environmental degradation, it is the highest duty of human beings to maintain balance in the environment.

Two human skeletons also found

Two types of garbage (rot and non-rot) were collected from the mountains, the statement said. The waste was managed separately and some of the waste is still being managed. The team took 55 days to clear the summits of Mount Everest and Lhotse, and 44 and 43 days at Kangchenjunga and Manaslu, respectively, the statement said. Two human skeletons were also found at Kangchenjunga during the third phase of the expedition.

Need for separate battalion for cleaning Some waste is yet to be handed over. "The Director General of the Department of Tourism, Taranath Adhikari, said that a separate battalion or company is needed to protect and clean the mountains," My Republica newspaper reported.

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